Something I Forgot About The Super Bowl, And Why Brand Advertising Can Be Weird…

How’s it going? In all my excitement to tell you about commercials during the Super Bowl this year, I forgot to tell those of you who don’t know who actually won the game.

Missing the most important part…yeah…oops.

Anyway, the Broncos won against the Panthers 24-10.

On to the rest of things for today, and why I’m going to shove two commercials into one post–opposite sides of the spectrum.

The first commercial that I thought was more of a brand thing that was done really well was the one with Wix.com, the website-building people, and Kung Fu Panda.

Po the Panda’s dad is trying to figure out how to advertise so people come into his shop to buy (and presumably eat) noodles. After a lot of antics, Po’s kung-fu master suggests they use Wix.com to build a website, and get their name out there.

And at the end, the commercial says the movie, Kung Fu Panda 3 is due to be out in theaters soon.

There are a couple reasons why I thought this was good. First of all, it made the point that businesses have to advertise (in some way or other), to become known. It’s a strong point to make in today’s world, even though a lot of people have already made it.

And two, it was able to get two things done to advertise for both Wix and the movie in one shot.

(Oh, and it also used the relationship of Kung Fu Panda to introduce Wix–using something familiar to smooth out the presentation of something that may not be familiar).

Which also includes making a hilarious commercial because people enjoy humor and/or Kung Fu Panda.

As a fiction writer, you can use certain points of your setting, characters, or what-have-ya to bring your readers into something unfamiliar–like an alien landscape, or a society on Pluto. You keep mixing in the familiar with the unfamiliar, and before your readers know it, they’re sucked in to your story.

It works on a similar level for email writers or copywriters–only the familiarity in this case might be what prospects feel or think. The unfamiliar may be the solution–unless you’d like to make a comparison to a familiar solution that isn’t as effective as the one that you’re offering.

Now, on to the commercial I thought was not well done. As brand advertising, these commercials are basically a “we’re still here” kind of thing, and that’s it. Which is why sometimes things can get weird.

I’m referring to the Mountain Dew Kickstart commercial. A couple years back, or maybe last year, they did a similar thing with a hunting trophy popping off the wall and flopping around.

But this year, they had a weird monkey/puppy/human baby hybrid dancing around as the guys on the couch are drinking the Kickstart stuff, and doing some dancing themselves.

It was just strange, and a lot of times these commercials get noticed for their shock value and not too much else–even though getting noticed is still getting noticed (which made me think of the strange GoDaddy.com commercials they played during the Super Bowl the last couple years).

Being weird also means being remembered in this case, and they accomplished their goal because I’m writing to you about it now. So I’m kinda perpetuating things, but not for something good they came up with.

Anyway that’s about it for now.

If you have something (place, product, what-have-ya) that may be a little hard to get across to your readers/prospects, think of things that are familiar to them that you can mix in, and see if that doesn’t make it a lot easier for you.

Until next time,

Ty

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About Ty Mall

Thanks for stopping by. I've almost always been interested in writing, among other things. Along with discovering pop culture, I've uncovered a lot about the craft over the past 10 years. And whether you're a fiction writer or email copywriter, I'm here to pass on what I've found out. And have a ton of fun in the process.
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