If You’re Going to Turn Down a Project, Don’t Do This…

How was your weekend? Mine was pretty restful–no shopping or comics to speak of, though. This week will be another short one, because I’m getting to share in someone else’s happy occasion (which I may or may not talk about).

Anyway, let’s get to it.

A friend of mine offered me a project about a week and a half ago. This guy is actually my dad’s friend, and he’s been my friend too for about 20 years or more, so we go back a long way.

This project involved a friend of his who had a client whose dad left him some poems he wanted to get digitized. Hmm, it didn’t seem too, too bad at first.

Until my friend told me they were in Russian.

And I’m pretty sure he knows that I don’t read Russian. I got sent a sample scan, only to find out that these pages were handwritten…by someone I couldn’t communicate with.

And my brain short-circuited.

I was caught between friend mode and client mode, and it didn’t end well for my sanity. So I spent days scouring the internet (only about 30 minutes a day), knocking myself out to try to figure out any solution to this thing.

Thing is, if this friend of mine would have been a stranger, I would have immediately turned down the project, no questions, no problem.

It took me way longer than normal to realize that I couldn’t do this project, and would have to let it go.

I’ll probably draw a bunch of things out of this, either now or later, but just in case it’s not soon, remember…do your best to separate your relationship with someone and/or their opinion of you from a project you’re doing.

Stick around for tomorrow–I’ll tell you how things turned out overall.

Until next time,

Ty

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About Ty Mall

Thanks for stopping by. I've almost always been interested in writing, among other things. Along with discovering pop culture, I've uncovered a lot about the craft over the past 10 years. And whether you're a fiction writer or email copywriter, I'm here to pass on what I've found out. And have a ton of fun in the process.
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